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Salted_ A Manifesto On The World's Most Part 20

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1 cup heavy cream 2 cups milk 12 ounces dark chocolate (about 70 percent cacao), finely chopped 4 two-finger pinches Halen Mon Sea Salt with Taha'a Vanilla Heat the cream and milk in a small saucepan over medium heat until steaming but not boiling. Stir in the chocolate and keep stirring until completely melted. Remove from the heat and let cool for 30 minutes. This step helps to thicken the chocolate.

Reheat over very low heat, stirring often, until steam rises from the surface. Stir in the salt and serve in warm cups.

SWEET MURRAY RIVER SIDECAR.

SERVES 1.

Imagine strolling home along the long dusty road after a hard day in the fields. At the crossroads you encounter a gaggle of tow-haired youngsters sitting at a card table. "Sidecar, mister?" they shout. The sidecar is a lemonade drink for grown-ups. A touch of salt opens up the entire experience, makes it restorative. Citrus playing tag with sugar, chilled juice teeter-tottering with warming alcohol, the entire drink alloyed with salt's wisdom and captured beautifully in a glass of coppery liquid.



1 three-finger pinch Murray River flake salt 1 tablespoon sugar ounce fresh lemon juice, plus more for wetting rim 1 ounces Cognac or good brandy ounce triple sec 1 strip lemon zest Combine the salt and sugar on a flat plate. Wet the rim of a highball glass with the lemon juice. Place the glass upside down on the plate to rim it with the salt and sugar. Put the glass in the freezer.

Combine the Cognac, triple sec, and the ounce lemon juice over ice in a shaker and shake well for 5 seconds. Remove the glass from the freezer and strain the drink into the glass. Garnish with a twist of lemon zest. This drink can also be served on the rocks: pour ice and liquor into an old-fashioned glass rimmed with the sugar-salt mixture.

BOURBON ON THE ROCKS WITH IBURI-JIO CHERRY SMOKED SALT.

SERVES 1.

Some bourbons, though they may come from deep in the Kentucky heartland of America, bear within them all the smoky mystery of a single malt Scotch brewed on the edge of a peaty moor in Scotland. To revel in the delicious tension of these two great whiskey regions, smoky up your bourbon with a pinch of smoked salt on the rocks. Take the sensation to its near-ridiculous extreme by making that smoked salt Iburi-jio Cherry, a soft and supple deep-sea salt cold-smoked with cherry wood from that much newer but dead-serious whiskey-making region, Japan. The salt brings just a hint of smoked bacon aroma that whets your appetite even as the drink slakes your thirst.

2 ounces bourbon whiskey, such as Woodford Reserve or Baker's Scant two-finger pinch Iburi-Jio Cherry salt Fill a rocks glass half full with large ice cubes. Pour the whiskey over the rocks; it should come not more than two-thirds of the way to the top of the ice. Sprinkle with the salt. Inhale. Imbibe.

ALAEA HAWAIIAN BLOODY MARY.

SERVES 1.

Life is so important. There is something you really need to say. But the high voltage coil of iron-rich Alaea Hawaiian salt rimming the Bloody Mary glass at your finger draws you like an electromagnet. The first sip trips the circuit and sends the electrical charge through your body, electrifying your nervous system, vibrating your body, rebooting the brain stem. The surge of spicy tomato juice, tangy citrus, and vaporizing horseradish courses through you. A nibble at the turgid stalk of celery returns things to rights, but by now you are far away, refreshed, restored, forgetting what it was you wanted to say.

Fine alaea Hawaiian salt Juice of lemon 2 ounces vodka 2 dashes celery bitters 6 drops clam juice 6 drops Worcestershire sauce 1 teaspoon horseradish 3 to 6 drops Tabasco sauce 3 grinds coarsely ground black pepper 3 ounces unsalted tomato juice 1 long, fine celery stalk, leaves still attached, for garnish Put a three-finger pinch of alaea salt on a flat plate. Wet the edge of a tall highball glass with the squeezed-out lemon rind. Place the glass upside down on the plate to rim it with salt.

Combine the lemon juice, vodka, bitters, clam juice, Worcestershire, horseradish, Tabasco, pepper, tomato juice, and 1 two-finger pinch alaea salt in a shaker over ice. Stir thoroughly for 5 seconds, pour the liquid and ice into the glass, and garnish with the celery.

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KONA SALT AND COCOA-RIMMED PLANTATION RUM.

SERVES 1.

Rum is distilled from various sweet products of sugarcane. Playing off rum's sweet origins, a touch of citrusy-sweet chocolate adds intrigue to the strident heat of the alcohol, and a touch of salt unifies everything in a rush of flavor that would make Willy Wonka jealous. Cocoa powder can be substituted for the cacao beans or nibs, though it lacks their nutty fullness. No liquor cabinet should be without a small bottle of honey-smooth, smoky, tangerine-flavored Rangpur lime syrup. Made from the lime's peel and juice, it is great not only to wet the rim of a cocktail glass, but also as a mixer in mojitos and margaritas. Kona deep sea salt is big, with a firm backbone of mineral and a glint of fresh fruit sweetness that bring harmony through leadership rather than brute force.

1 three-finger pinch Kona sea salt or Papohaku white salt teaspoon cacao beans or nibs, pounded into powder with a mortar and pestle teaspoon Rangpur lime syrup or agave syrup 1 ounces good dark rum, such as Westerhall Plantation Rum Combine the salt and powdered cacao on a flat plate. Wet the rim of a highball glass with the lime syrup. Place the glass upside down on the plate to rim it with salt and chocolate. In this case, less is more, so go easy on the salt-chocolate mixture. Drop a handful of ice cubes into the glass and pour the rum over. Inhale, touch the rim with your tongue, sip, and enjoy.

JAL JEERA.

SERVES 4.

The true taste of a place is found in its little oddities, and northern India is no exception. Nowhere are the distinctive attitudes and sensibilities of a people better captured than in the lemonade of northern India. Jal jeera Jal jeera is Hindi for "cumin water," but it's the wild and unruly yet ultimately constructive influence of India's famous, sulfuric kala namak salt that lends this drink its edge. It's traditionally drunk before a meal, but any hot day provides a great excuse to duck into the shade, mix up a tall iced glass of jal jeera, and tilt your face up to the sun to offer a prayer to the sun god Surya. is Hindi for "cumin water," but it's the wild and unruly yet ultimately constructive influence of India's famous, sulfuric kala namak salt that lends this drink its edge. It's traditionally drunk before a meal, but any hot day provides a great excuse to duck into the shade, mix up a tall iced glass of jal jeera, and tilt your face up to the sun to offer a prayer to the sun god Surya.

2 tablespoons whole cumin seeds 4 teaspoons fresh cilantro leaves 2 teaspoons sugar cup fresh mint leaves 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice teaspoon kala namak salt 4 cups cold water lemon, cut into 4 wedges, for garnish 4 mint sprigs, for garnish Preheat the oven to 450F. Line a rimmed baking sheet with foil.

Pound the cumin in a mortar and pestle until cracked, then spread on the prepared baking sheet. Roast for 3 to 5 minutes, until fragrant and lightly toasted, being careful not to burn.

Add the cilantro, sugar, and mint to the mortar and crush with the pestle into a paste. Combine the paste with the toasted cumin, lemon juice, and kala namak in a large jar (at least 1 quarts) and mix thoroughly. Add the water and some ice; seal the jar and shake vigorously. Pour ice and all into 4 tall glasses, garnish with lemon wedges and mint sprigs, and serve.

SALTY DOG WITH A PEACHY BOLIVIAN ROSE RIM.

SERVES 1.

The venerable Greyhound is made with vodka or gin and grapefruit juice, and if you salt that hound, you get a Salty Dog. So goes the logic. But logic is dull-or lonely. Vodka craves company. Its pure grain simplicity is receptive to a host of improvements that would wither under gin's herbaceous glare. And who doesn't love a peach, with all that it conjures-from climbing fruit trees to sipping Bellinis? And with the right salt-like a springwater fresh Bolivian Rose salt-the vodka and peach open up with a smiling opulence that quells the furor of even the surliest god.

1 three-finger pinch Bolivian Rose salt Dash peach bitters 2 ounces vodka 5 ounces fresh grapefruit juice Put the salt on a flat plate. Wet the rim of an old-fashioned glass with the peach bitters. Place the glass upside down on the plate to rim it with salt.

Combine the vodka and grapefruit juice with a scoop of ice cubes in a shaker, shake vigorously for 5 seconds, and pour into the glass.

VARIATION: For a Salted Chocolate Chihuahua, substitute tequila for vodka and rim the glass with chocolate bitters and salt. For a Salted Chocolate Chihuahua, substitute tequila for vodka and rim the glass with chocolate bitters and salt.

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THE MEADOW MARTINI.

SERVES 2.

Salting is a way. It's the path you take. It lets you discover a passage through the brambles, defines the terrain ahead, sets you on a lost trail, and, toward the summit, reveals key ledges and handholds. The better your use of salt, the higher you can climb and the more enjoyable the ascent. And the view from up top is worth it. The Meadow Martini is a diamond-perfect expression of salt's power to offer the clearest imaginable view of the most magical possible vista. Crushed Tasmanian pepperberries send blossoms of hydrangea crimson into the translucent liquid of the gin, unleashing extravagant botanical flavors. Tasmanian pepperberry (Tasmannia lanceolata) (Tasmannia lanceolata) is sometimes used as a substitute for Szechuan pepper, though it harbors none of the heat and frankly bears no resemblance. If you can't locate any, substitute a few petals of dried hibiscus or just enjoy your martini in its classic perfection, an arc of Shinkai Deep Sea salt as its only embellishment. Shinkai imparts to the lips the felicitous texture of confetti, and the unalloyed flavor of happiness itself. is sometimes used as a substitute for Szechuan pepper, though it harbors none of the heat and frankly bears no resemblance. If you can't locate any, substitute a few petals of dried hibiscus or just enjoy your martini in its classic perfection, an arc of Shinkai Deep Sea salt as its only embellishment. Shinkai imparts to the lips the felicitous texture of confetti, and the unalloyed flavor of happiness itself.

6 Tasmanian berries 4 ounces excellent gin, such as Citadelle, Miller's, or Bombay Sapphire 1 three-finger pinch Shinkai deep sea salt 1 lemon wedge Gently crush the peppercorns with the flat edge of a kitchen knife. Combine the peppercorns and gin in a glass beaker or jar. Allow the peppercorns to infuse into the gin for 5 to 10 minutes.

Meanwhile, put the salt on a flat plate. Rub the rims of two martini glasses with the lemon wedge. Place each glass upside down on the plate to rim it with salt, then place in the freezer for at least 5 minutes.

To make the cocktail, put one scoop of ice cubes in a shaker and strain the gin over the ice. Allow to stand for 15 seconds, then very gently stir for 5 seconds. Allow to stand for another 15 seconds. Remove the martini glasses from the freezer, gently stir the gin again, and strain it into the glasses. Serve.

MARLBOROUGH FLAKEY MARGARITA.

SERVES 1.

Salt makes tart things taste sweeter (and, oddly, cuts the sweetness of sweet things to bring out their subtler flavors) and mellows the sharpness of alcohol. The salted rim of the margarita is iconic because it capitalizes on all the opportunities lurking within the sweet-tart-alcohol bite of the cocktail; because it is beautiful; and because it revives us with every sip. The salted rim allows margaritas to be served on the tart side, so this recipe calls for more fresh lime juice and less triple sec than is commonly recommended. As tempting as it may be to bring out the heavy guns and rim the cocktail with more massive flake salts, I often prefer the fine crystalline froth of Marlborough flakey. It gives a truly satisfying crunch, like the feeling of stepping on powdered snow-a welcome sensation when drinking a margarita in the waning heat of a late summer afternoon.

1 three-finger pinch Marlborough flakey salt juicy lime 1 ounces silver tequila (100 percent agave) ounce triple sec Put the salt on a flat plate. Squeeze the lime juice into a shaker and rub the rim of a margarita glass with the wet, squeezed-out rind. Place the glass upside down on the plate to rim it with salt.

Add the tequila, triple sec, and a scoop of ice to the shaker and shake vigorously for 10 seconds to thoroughly foam the mixture. Pour the drink, ice and all, into the glass.

VARIATIONS: This drink can be served up or blended, as well as on the rocks. For an up cocktail, combine the ingredients, shake vigorously for 10 seconds, and strain into a chilled martini glass. For a blended drink, combine the lime juice, tequila, and triple sec in a blender with a scoop of ice, blend for 15 seconds, and pour into a margarita glass. This drink can be served up or blended, as well as on the rocks. For an up cocktail, combine the ingredients, shake vigorously for 10 seconds, and strain into a chilled martini glass. For a blended drink, combine the lime juice, tequila, and triple sec in a blender with a scoop of ice, blend for 15 seconds, and pour into a margarita glass.

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Resources HOW TO SHOP FOR SALT.

PACKAGING: If a salt contains moisture, be sure it is sold in a resealable container. Any moist salt sold in cellophane or a box should be avoided if possible. Dry salts such as flake, rock, and dry traditional salts may be shipped in porous containers. If a salt contains moisture, be sure it is sold in a resealable container. Any moist salt sold in cellophane or a box should be avoided if possible. Dry salts such as flake, rock, and dry traditional salts may be shipped in porous containers.

BULK BINS: Bulk salts are every bit as good as salts sold in individually sealed packages, provided the bins are well sealed to keep in moisture-preferably lined with glass or food-grade plastic. Salts bought in bulk bins should be stored in airtight containers. Bulk salts are every bit as good as salts sold in individually sealed packages, provided the bins are well sealed to keep in moisture-preferably lined with glass or food-grade plastic. Salts bought in bulk bins should be stored in airtight containers.

TINS: Salt is hygroscopic, meaning it collects moisture from the open air. Combined with moisture and oxygen, salt will quickly rust metal. Avoid buying any salt product that comes in tins, unless the tins are small enough or your consumption is rapid enough that you can beat the inevitable rust. Most tins are coated to ward off rust, but the moment you remove and replace the lid, grinding a few fine particles of salt between the lid and the container in the process, rust will start to form. At The Meadow, we sell one-ounce tins of popular salts for rapid consumption, but tins larger than that tend to rust in the spice cabinet. Salt is hygroscopic, meaning it collects moisture from the open air. Combined with moisture and oxygen, salt will quickly rust metal. Avoid buying any salt product that comes in tins, unless the tins are small enough or your consumption is rapid enough that you can beat the inevitable rust. Most tins are coated to ward off rust, but the moment you remove and replace the lid, grinding a few fine particles of salt between the lid and the container in the process, rust will start to form. At The Meadow, we sell one-ounce tins of popular salts for rapid consumption, but tins larger than that tend to rust in the spice cabinet.

EXPIRATION DATES: Most salts do not spoil, ever. Some can grow stale. Wet salts will lose their moisture, and dry salts may take some on. Again, sealed containers are helpful for keeping salt in its best possible condition. Some salts, such as kala namak, do have minerals or compounds like sulfur that react with moisture and oxygen in the air, making the salt lose some of its potency. Kala namak should be bought coarse if possible and ground as needed to benefit from its full aromas. Other salts, such as smoked or infused salts, will indeed go stale if left unsealed. Most salts do not spoil, ever. Some can grow stale. Wet salts will lose their moisture, and dry salts may take some on. Again, sealed containers are helpful for keeping salt in its best possible condition. Some salts, such as kala namak, do have minerals or compounds like sulfur that react with moisture and oxygen in the air, making the salt lose some of its potency. Kala namak should be bought coarse if possible and ground as needed to benefit from its full aromas. Other salts, such as smoked or infused salts, will indeed go stale if left unsealed.

Guidelines for shelf life: Fleur de sel, sel gris, moist traditional salt, and shio in a sealed glass container will last indefinitely.

Flake, dry traditional, and rock salts will last indefinitely under dry to moderately humid conditions, indefinitely in cardboard or other containers.

Smoked, blended, and infused salts will last one year in a sealed glass container.

WHERE TO SHOP.

There are a good many retailers offering a selection of salts, though their organization and level of description vary enormously. A good many tend to just re-sell or repackage salt from a small circle of salt importers. Below are a few of the more established websites for salt shopping. All have excellent customer service, in my experience, and source a good portion of their selection directly from salt makers. Importing salt from every corner of the globe takes experience and concentrated effort, so the businesses that specialize in salt tend to have more expertise and better selection than generalists.

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